Camille Alexandre | Founder of Creativesyria Canada
August 25th, 2007

Re: ‘Syrian expatriates

Last month my good friend Ghassan – a Syrian/Canadian – was working late in the evening, like he always does, at his office in Allentown – a small, totally undistinguished city near Philadelphia. The head office of the company he worked for was the place he needed to move to in order to advance his highly successful Engineering career. He is on his way to becoming vice president of one of America??s top makers of semi-conductors. Last year he sold his house in Montreal, and moved to Allentown along with his wife and three young children. They still don??t have any friends in Allentown.

His cell phone rang. It was his high school friend Abed calling from Aleppo. It was 4am in Syria and Abed seemed to be in a great mood. “My friend Ghassan, listen ? Can you hear him? ? Sabah Fakhri is singing live here! Tonight he has been excellent! ?Do you know what you are missing? The Kebab Meshwi has also been extraordinary! ? come back to Aleppo you idiot!”

This was not the first time Abed called Ghassan from a Sabah Fakhri concert. In fact he has been adhering to that tradition for years. But this year it was the first time Ghassan did not take Abed??s suggestion as a pure joke. The next day he called me and asked ??do you think I am really an idiot? They surely sound like they are enjoying their life much more that I am.?

Something must have changed the past year. For Ghassan and many other fully Canadianized Syrian friends of mine, the thought of returning to Syria is now worth contemplating.

When my family immigrated to Montreal in 1982 I was expecting to be surrounded with Canadians. To my surprise, the early eighties were the time Syrian families immigrated to Montreal en masse. I was in Canada living happily among fellow Syrians. With the exception of some of us who never tolerated the endless Canadian winters, or the highly competitive working environment, we all decided to stay in Montreal for the rest of our lives. Going back to Syria was only a temporary consideration that always generated either a smile, at least for those who left on a happy note.

Many years ago a Syrian minister of culture visited Montreal. The Syrian community here organized a dinner reception to welcome her. She spoke to me and to a number of my fellow young Syrians about how our country needs us to go back. Our reaction was: ??she must be joking! .. who would leave Canada and go back to Syria!?

Things changed. Now it seems that those who want to go back to Syria are not entirely made of the ones who gave up on making it in Montreal. Some highly successful individuals are seriously planning to examine their future prospects in Syria during their next summer visit.

First, it is becoming much harder to forget our Arab culture. When you sit in the living room of a Syrian expat you will find out that more often than not he is now equipped with an Arabic satellite dish that changed his TV viewing habits. It became fashionable to watch Aljazeera, Nancy Ajram, and the latest Syrian TV series. Some of my trendy friends who are very Canadianized do not even have subscription to non Arabic TV channels anymore. After few months of parallel Arabic/English programming, they realized that Arabic TV is so much more appealing to them.

If the TV set failed to convince you to fall in love again with Syria, one of the many extensive Syria photo blogs probably will. Bridget Palmer is an American young woman who lived in Syria for two years while her husband Jeremy studied Arabic in Damascus. She traveled the county and collected over 300 photos and interesting stories that she posted on her blog ??my adventures in Syria?. Bridget fell in love with Syria and its people and it shows throughout her writings. We always knew that foreigners visiting Syria came back with positive impressions. But lately we are hearing of foreigners who came back impressed after living in Syria for years. Imagine how much we would enjoy it too. Bridget called her newborn daughter ??Miriam Damascus.?

And finally, frequent news of recent big investments in Syria are highlighting the promising prospects of the Syrian economy. Syrians who managed to have some extra savings are now considering investing in a land somewhere outside Damascus and Aleppo hoping that those cities will continue to expand at an accelerating rate.

But for the most part, reverse immigration today is heading to Dubai. Syria might be winning the hearts, but Dubai is winning the minds. How can Syria compete with Dubai?

Economically it can not easily compete. But it can win the battle of lifestyle and quality of living. Yet, even there, there are challenges to be tackled: Pollution, corruption, and mismanagement. One would feel guilty taking his family back to breathe the highly polluted air in Damascus and Aleppo. If they need medical attention in a Syrian hospital, is it going to be professional and clean?. If they needed a permit to renovate their new apartment will they have to go through the bureaucratic hell that they used to see in Ghawwar??s TV series n the 70??s and 80??s?

These are not luxuries. Despite the urge to go back to Syria, for now most will say ??hopefully next year if things improve?.

Camille Alexandre Otrakji is the founder of creativesyria.com and mideastimage.com.

This article originally appeared in FW: magazine. The Ghassan story is not entirely accurate : )

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40 Responses to the Article

Yazan Badran Says:

Camille, ya3ni, it is your forum, u might as well stick to the question…

You didnt answer, or go near any of the questions you yourself posed.

Your post is telling in a very elegant way ofcourse, that Syria is shaping up, and that a lot of people wanna go back now. YAY.

But, you didn’t say anything about, what exactly can they do? what exactly will they do? What kind of incentives are they given [other than the wonderful, albeit, mortal Sabah Fakhri]. You didn’t even discuss the absolute disaster [at least to me] that is our diplomatic staff outside, or the bigger disaster that is Buthaina Shaaban and her self proclaimed Ministry [whether u agree or not]…

What your telling us, is that a lot of people wanna come back because of the oh-so-great Syrian drama?
it’s like you wrote a mawdo3 ta3beer 3an el-rabee3, my friend.

let me ask YOU [not the whole expat community you speak of] again…

1. What role could expatriates play in building a better Syria?
2. Are you satisfied with the government legislations concerning them?
3. Are you satisfied with the performance of the minister of Expatriates’ Affairs Dr. Buthayna Shaaban?

And since its the comment section now, please don’t apply any restrictions on the number of words… 😉

cheers.

Alex Says:

You see, my friend Mr. Majhool who proposed this topic was supposed to write about these same questions and I was planning to turn his post into a good debate about the topic. But eventually he could not find much to say apparently!

So I will answer your questions in few hours : )

Mazen Says:

Alex, the sentence “Come back to Aleppo you idiot” and the question your friend asked you while contemplating the idea were an excellent metaphor of the question of Syrian Expats. I want to thank Majhool and yourself for this excellent subject, and I have one thing to ask of you:

Please consider making the subject life span two months instead of one, especially this one. I expect you are going to receive a flood of responses for this subject.

Hammam Yousef Says:

Alex,
One question, are they paying you man?! :)

I was living in Dubai for 4 years and all my friends who went to Syria for the summer vacation ??I couldn??t risk trying my luck and go there my self- when returned, expressed how miserable everything is, garbage in the streets, no law, corrupt police everywhere, streets are bad and buildings are dirty and darkness, yes? streets were dark at night compared to shiny desert highways of UAE!

But I have to say that they all were amazed that people were smiling and going out to restaurants cafes ?etc, as if there were high on drugs! I guess? in Syrian we say Tannesh Ta3esh Tanta3esh, this is the only explaination I can think of right now!

For another look at the situation in Syria I suggest here ( in Arabic ) for a very recent spontaneous reflection from a young man in Damascus :) just as an example.

And yes? What about Buthayna?! To tell you the truth man? I don??t like her at all. I hope she is reading this! 😉

Majhool Says:

Yazan,

you read my mind, I was like what about the expatriate? legistlations? Buthayna? why the bleed is happening? who is responisble? how can we fix it? etc.. to2 to2 to2

Majhool Says:

Alex,

wala tez3al. I took it upon my self to finish the article today and I did. so check your email.

Majhool Says:

Alex,

You have, in your post, misrepresnted expatriate’s hopes, challnges, needs, fears. You painted a picture far from the truth. Expatiraites have always romanticize about going back and that has nothing to do with Syria getting better ( as you would like your readers to believe) In fact many who go back only to leave again.

We miss our culutre, brothers, sisters, newborn relatives, sabah fakhri. etc…That is the truth and not becasue the reasons that necessated their departure changed.

I personaly, and from time to time, feel an overwhilming urge to just pack and go back. I get scared of ideas such as having one of my parents pass away while thousands of miles away and in need for “muwafaka from the keyada el korteyyah” just to attend a belated funeral.

That is reality my freind. these post-modern thoughts you presented are serious insuluts to what we go through far away from home.

naim Says:

Hammam ,
What you said about the problems that Syria has are true but many of these problems can be solved if people have initiatives and can work together to improve things , The Garbage in the street does not need an order from Damascus or the president to correct the dirty streets needs volunteers to clean the streets or donate money to do that going out to restaurants in Syria is expensive and there are many well to do people who can help charitable organisation can be the vehicles that can improve Syria as long as they can do more than building houses of worship.
Alex , Allentown has many Syrians from AOMAR ALHUSIN in Syria , I lived in Reading ,PA in the early Eighties ,
Your friend would do better for Syria if he can advance in his company and convince them to open a branch and training in Aleppo.

Alex Says:

Hammam,

“They” don’t need to pay me for the opportunity to communicate with some of the smartest and best intentioned Syrians.

Mazen,

I will try to leave this topic for at least a month, especially if there is an ongoing debate until then.

To be honest with you, I was planning to start the next topic in two weeks. Syria’s regional relations (Lebanon, Saudi Arabia …) is begging to be discussed. There is so much drama and controversy … I would like to hear everyone’s opinion.

And Japanese Bashmouhandes Yazan:

You said:

let me ask YOU [not the whole expat community you speak of] again?

1. What role could expatriates play in building a better Syria?
2. Are you satisfied with the government legislations concerning them?
3. Are you satisfied with the performance of the minister of Expatriates?? Affairs Dr. Buthayna Shaaban?

I never speak of “the whole” … if you catch me sounding like I am implying “the whole” please let me know. Above, I meant “many” … or “many more than before”

1) Expatriates can play a major role in building Syria. The average Syrian expat is probably richer, better educated, and more dynamic than the average Syrian who did not experience studying or living outside the city he was born in.

Although I agree with Majhool’s call for accountability and for the rule of law, I do not agree with his generalization and exaggeration. Sami Moubayed is not Syrian expat. He is doing all he can to help his country, despite the obvious difficulties of functioning within today’s Syria.

Similarly, many Syrian expats can contribute in many ways … each one knows what he is good at …

2) I am far from being an expert on government legislations on this topic… so I will not add any useless comments.

3) Dr. Shaaban part … I’ll continue tomorrow.

Hammam Yousef Says:

naim,
??The Garbage in the street does not need an order from Damascus or the president?

What a nice cliché? the fact that people should not litter is accepted, but to lift the responsibility totaly off the people who??s work is to clean, considering that fact that there is a ??GARBAGE TAX!? is bulshit.

Other thought… why not we see the ??President? cleaning the streets as an example for other Syrians? can he do that?

Since Mr. P said in his S/election speech that people should share the responsibility with the government, the government is not doing anything to make peoples lives easier? why? BECAUSE THEY SHOULD DO IT THEM SELVES!!! Then why the hell there is a government and a regime at all? ?just to fuck countries like Syria, Lebanon, and Iraq!!

??as they can do more than building houses of worship.?
Although I agree on the principle, why are you stuck on it man! Are you an atheist!? 😉

Zenobia Says:

Naim! yes, on the subject of Allentown, PA.
I was completely bewildered by the start of the story of Camille’s friend Ghassan…lonely in Allentown. Apparently, that is like saying he moved to Deerborn and couldn’t find any Syrians.

I was planning to write a section for this topic and decided not to because i didn’t feel I had enough to say, but I had begun a short piece and ironically began it with the anecdote that only three weeks ago I was traveling in coastal Syria and stopped in a village called Amar al Husn! I had some coffee with a family who informed me that almost the entire village of several thousand people lives during the in ….. Allentown, Pennsylvania.
In winter, i was told, there are only about a few hundred, and in summer…everyone returns….
this father told me to go down to the playground up the street…and i will see all english speaking children…american children… playing together.
And somewhat related to Alex’s piece.. (despite the flak he got for not answering the pertinent questions)… my host.. also told me his own story of living in the States for sixteen years.. and then how he made the decision finally about five years ago to return to permanent life in Syria. He is much happier now, he told me.

As for the comparison between life in Dubai and in Syria…. is that a fair comparison…? aren’t these completely different lifestyles?
Actually, I also met in my travels… another village dweller visiting home from Dubai… and he was unequivocal in his hope to return to Syria which he missed a lot.
so… i will have to think about that…and get back to you.

Alex Says:

Zenobia,

Thanks for the info but …my friend in Allentown might be moving to Australia soon : )

Thank you for confirming to Majhool what I was trying to say … that lately many more Syrians are thinking about returning… and they are thinking seriously about it. Before, we all had dreams about returning, like he suggested. But dreaming is not enough … some practical aspects are the deciding factors. Changes in the banking system, investment laws, seeing many Gulf Arabs willing to enter the Syrian market are all important factors in moving you from the stage of nostalgia to active planning to return.

As for Dubai .. what can I say. I probably know more Syrians in Dubai than anywhere else … Of course I prefer Damascus and Aleppo (and Dreikeesh) to Dubai. But I bet that there are more Syrians moving back to Dubai than those moving back to Damascus. Let’s try to see if there are any stats we can get from the Syrian embassy.

Alex Says:

Hammam, we do have an atheist in the house … but it is not Naim.

Can you guess who it is?

Alex Says:

And I will answer your question about Dr. Shabaan:

1) I give her top marks for motivation. She genuinely wants to make a difference… I can’t think of any other Syrian minister who demonstrated a similar level of energy.

2) She is an excellent communicator one-on-one. When she visited Canada last year she managed to impress Canadian officials and elected politicians who met with her. A Montreal MP told my father after she met Buthaina that she hopes Buthaina will be Syria’s next prime minister… they were delighted to meet her.

Same applies to Syrian expats in Montreal who found her very charming but were a bit disappointed in her intermittently baathist tone. couple of “Syrian opposition” members insulted her of course in a Q&A … I would much rather hear a baathist than a filthy mouthed “oppositionist”

But I agree that she is sometimes too much of an Arab nationalist. Most of us Syrians do not fall in that extreme.

3) as a semi-official spokesperson for Syria … mixed results. Like any spokesperson of any government, she has to say nothing negative about her government … this makes her lose credibility of course… sometimes she has to lie … again like the rest of them.

I am very much for limiting Buthaina’s role as a spokesperson for Syria. We need more independents .. like Sami Moubayed for example. Rime Allaf, Murhaf joujati …

I had a friendly discussion last week with one of Asharq al-Awsat’s editors about his paper’s anti-Syria role the past two years. He refused to accept my argument by pointing out that despite the many anti-Syria commentators, they allowed Syria a voice in the paper through Buthaina’s weekly column. I asked him to find another Syrian voice .. Buthaina could not answer any of the other charges from the Saudi and Egyptian writers in Asharq al-Awsat because she can’t criticize those Arab governments. So she ends up writing about Palestinian Olive trees and Iraqi women who lost their children in the war… the past six months she did not mention “syria” in any of her articles … expect the one this week actually.

4) As a Syrian minister of expatriate affairs… gain, she is excellent, trying the best she can with the very limited means that a minister in Syria has. I doubt that whoever replaces her will have any additional tools under his disposal to get more things done. What was not achieved so far probably has to much opposition elsewhere in the system (Syria).

But again, Buthaina is too controversial in her political positions. This makes her unwelcome by some Syrian expats, regardless of what she is achieving or not achieving. She should not mix the two jobs … defending Arab nationalism today then meeting Syrian expats in Chicago tomorrow do not mix too well… and public speaking is taking a lot of her time … she might make better use of that time to work on a more useful website for the ministry … something which has up to date information.

Finally, i will switch back to positive feedback. Buthaina is a brilliant woman. this opinion comes from Tim Sebastian ex-BBC host of the popular Hard talk, now the moderator of the Doha Debates. he told a friend of mine that he would love to have Buthaina on the Doha debates because she is a brilliant debater. He interviewed her on Hard talk and was very impressed with how she defended Syria’s position.

Conclusion?

Either drop most of the “Syria spokesperson” duties and concentrate on the ministry, or drop the ministry and the official link to the government, but become a full time, more independent, spokesperson for Syria.

Keeping both jobs leads to many conflicts. I understand much of the criticism here and elsewhere.

Hammam Yousef Says:

Alex dear Alex :)

I am not keen on knowing really. But my sensitivity to those who have a hostile attitude towards religion and/ or religious symbols is little high, I admit. Of course I would want expats money to go in productive educational and developmental channels, but I don??t see that only places of worship are the bad choice.

You may be the atheist or anyone as a matter of fact, it doesn??t have much to do when discussing ideas Objectively, I think.

Here are some ??faces? from syria that might say without words here and here, sometimes the site doesn??t respond quick, I hope it will work smooth.

see ya

Alex Says:

I am not an atheist : )

abu kareem Says:

Alex,

For someone who always ready with hard-nosed critiques of all of our opinions, I have to say that this is a piece of sentimental fluff. Nicely written, heart-warming, sentimental fluff, but fluff non the less. It is every expat’s sentimental longing.

Zenobia Says:

you didn’t know that he is fluffy underneath? …really very very fluffy… underneath all those lists and charts for measuring this and that…

Zenobia Says:

hmm.
you didn’t know that Alex is fluffy and sentimental underneath? …really very very fluffy… underneath all those lists and charts for measuring this and that…

Zenobia Says:

should i repeat that a third time?

Hammam Yousef Says:

yes please Zenobia, I still didn’t get it :)

Alex Says:

lol
I wake up today to read those charges of being fluffy and sentimental !

Of course I am sentimental… or as sentimental as an engineer can be.

Here is an example: Bossa Nova music. I love it more than any music … because when I was 3 (again) my dad visited Brazil and came back with “the best of Brazilian Music” album. I used to play it the whole day… our apartment in Damascus was full of Bossa Nova music all the time.

And don’t forget that I “play music” … but this is the instrument I play.

Naim Nazha MD Says:

I am not an atheist , I believe that religion is a way not a goal , a way to live in peace with our neighbors and do to them what we want them to do to us , people who do that deserve heaven no matter what their believes are. going to worship houses is to remind people to be good and consolidate their believes as is getting booster shots after vaccines to keep the immunity that they need.

Yazan Badran Says:

Who’s looking for an Atheist?!

Regardless, It is not my place to say whether a new Mosque is more important than a good vinyl bar, just as long as you wouldn’t assume the opposite ofcourse.

How did this conversation turn that way anyway? we were talking about Mrs. Shaaban, whom used my dad’s next door neighbor most of her young years, in the outskirts of Homs’s el-Zahra neighborhood.
I think that she is too dogmatic for such a sensitive position, I think that she’s a lousy lawyer for a worse cause, and that she oughtta leave, period.

Naim Says:

Yazan , i was asking to spend on charties as long as they are not house of worship , hammam thoghut that i were an Athiest.

Hammam Yousef Says:

Naim, Yazan,
I didn’t think anyone is atheist, just joked about it, then Alex mentioned that there is an atheist in the group… merely a joke thing.

I did, howvere, speculated about Yazan… :) why man why! :)

Yazan Badran Says:

hehe, you’re all talking about it as if it’s an insult, or more of an accusation…

I am not sure if this post is what Alex was referring to..
http://zozo2k3.blogspot.com/2007/02/im-atheist-moslem.html

Hammam Yousef Says:

Yazan,

Nice post, I totally liked it… especially the last ones… hahahahh 😀

BTW, do you have doubts some times that there is a GOD?
If Yes… then it is your answer!

??Doubt is the other face of certainty?

Hammam Yousef Says:

follow up:

last ones=comments
😀

Yazan Badran Says:

Do you doubt that there might not? 😉

It works both ways my friend.

You’re taking it to a whole new level, you’re question requires a follow up question, What is Truth? What is Reality? Is there a Reality that is independent from us?

Certainty, is an over-used word in our world. So, ofcourse I doubt.

Yazan Badran Says:

The comments? lol…

I never delete a comment… 😉

Hammam Yousef Says:

Yazan,

I really don’t want to get into this, after all, it is not my duty to prove that there is a God or not. Besides, this forum is supposed to discuss other matters that is easier to feel it??s existence. :)

However… Doubt my friend is when you are not sure about the existence of something, NOT about the Un-existence of it! I think.

Is there a reality that is independent from us? Big question, I tend to believe that there is, can I prove it to you? am not sure! Truth! I think it is there and we as humanity are trying to reach it, but to which extent we can go is another matter, and maybe we won??t reach it as an absolute. Other than that, we can??t move on in life if we don??t believe, doesn??t matter what we believe in, anything can be a belief, Rat Worship, Devil Worship, Dollar Worship, Power, Self, Nothingness? etc.

I have wrote few words in Arabic almost in this regard feel free to read it if you have time, you can find it on this thread, read all, or just scroll to my entry.
http://groups.google.com/group/public4islam/browse_thread/thread/41e3ee5070b005fa?hl=en

ciao

Hammam Yousef Says:

Yazan,

I really don’t want to get into this, after all, it is not my duty to prove that there is a God or not. Besides, this forum is supposed to discuss other matters that is easier to feel it??s existence. :)

However… Doubt my friend is when you are not sure about the existence of something, NOT about the Un-existence of it! I think.

Is there a reality that is independent from us? Big question, I tend to believe that there is, can I prove it to you? am not sure! Truth! I think it is there and we as humanity are trying to reach it, but to which extent we can go is another matter, and maybe we won??t reach it as an absolute. Other than that, we can??t move on in life if we don??t believe, doesn??t matter what we believe in, anything can be a belief, Rat Worship, Devil Worship, Dollar Worship, Power, Self, Nothingness? etc.

I have wrote few words in Arabic almost in this regard feel free to read it if you have time, you can find it on this thread, read all, or just scroll to my entry.
http://groups.google.com/group/public4islam/browse_thread/thread/41e3ee5070b005fa?hl=en

Dewa mata ではま?

Alex Says:

Yazan,

All humans are limited to the nicely rounded maximum limits of 20Hz-20KHz in audible frequencies.

Can you tell me why we are limited to those frequencies?

Hammam Yousef Says:

Alex,

could you explain more please? and you can use my email address considering the fourm’s topic :)

You made me curious! 😀

Yazan Badran Says:

At least we’re talking about something of substance, instead of Alex’s fluff!

What you wrote there is definitely interesting, except, that you assume that God exists, and you build on that.

I am not here to disprove God’s existence [and it is just as difficult as proving or disproving whether our lives as we know it now is merely a lucid dream], it was never my mission, and it’s of little importance to me. I have my own convictions, and like everything else in life they are not absolute. I don’t believe in absolutes [might be one of the reasons I don’t believe in God].

I won’t go as far as saying the universe centers around us humans. But so far, we are [to us] the only consciousness in this Universe, we “set” reality. Jostein Gaarder once described the Hubble space telescope as the “Eye of the Universe” I think that sums up what I believe in. We “see” the universe.

Alex? I have a feeling you’re gonna tell me?

Alex Says:

No Yazan (and Hammam), I will not “tell you” : )

I’m sure you already heard all the typical arguments (for and against) … so I just wanted to suggest to both of you a different place where you can potentially find more questions, and maybe some answers.

The rest is up to you to dig : )

Unfortunately this is not a topic we can discuss next month on Creative Forum : )

Yazan Badran Says:

Alex,

You like playing god don’t u! control freak!

Alex Says:

lol ! …control freak yes, playing God no.

Hammam Yousef ???ا? ??سف Says:

a paragraph from an article… these are the expats rights… enjoy

?ف? حا?ة أسرة أخر? ر?ت إحد? ا?أ??ات (د) ??ج?ة ا?س?ر?ة ?ح??? ا?إ?سا? ??ف استدعت أج?زة ا??خابرات أطفا??ا ا?صغار ا?ذ?? ?ا ?تجا?ز ع?ر أ?بر?? (عبد ا???) ث?ا?? س??ات ?استدراج?? ?است?طا??? ع? ?ا?د??: ?اذا ?ع???? داخ? ا???ز? ??اذا ?فع? ??اذا ????? ?أ?? ?ذ?ب ??? ?ز?ر?? ف? ا???اسبات ?ا?أع?اد ??? ?? أصحاب? ??عارف?? ?ذ?? ف? ا?ت?ا? ?اضح ?صارخ ?ح??? ا?طف??ة ا?ت? ?ف?ت?ا شرعة ح??? ا?إ?سا? ا?عا???ة”. ب? إ? ا??ح??? ??ف? ?ا أ?ردت? ا??ج?ة “?? ??تف با?استفسار ?ت?ج?? ا?أسئ?ة ب? ?ا? ??رر ????? ??? بص?رة استفزاز?ة ?ؤذ?ة ??شاعر?? تجا? ?ا?د??: ?? تعرف?? أ? أبا?? ?جر?? ?? تعرف?? أ??ا س?ف ???? ا??بض ع?? أب??? ???ت?? أ?ا? أ?ظار??? ?ر?د أ? ?خ?ص ا??ط? ?? ا?حشرات أ?ثا? أب???”. ?ف? حادثة أخر? “سأ? ا??ح?? ا?طف? (س???) ا?ذ? ?? ?تجا?ز ا?عاشرة: ?? تحب أبا?? فأجاب ا?طف? ?? ف?ر? ببراءة ?ع?? ف?ا ?ا? ?? ا??ح?? إ?ا أ? ?ج? ?? صفعة ?اس?ة ?ع ??? ?? ا?شتائ? ا??اذعة ??طف? ???ا?د? ???أسرة بر?ت?ا”.

http://www.thisissyria.net/2007/10/19/syriatoday/05.html

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